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Thank you, Netflix!

What do you do when you wake up at 5:00 a.m. with a great idea, but you don’t want to wake your lovely wife by getting up to grab the laptop? You grab the Netfilx envelope that happens to be within reach and write down your ideas. Fortunately a nub of a pencil happened to be in the vicinity as well.
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A rare peek into the past

My first comic strip was drawn with a Rapidograph. It was the only ink tool I had, and up to that point I hadn’t analyzed the work of other cartoonists to see what they were using. Eventually, I settled on a sable brush and Speedball ink. Drawing a comic strip with a brush turned out to be a lot more difficult than I ever imagined. I was like a toddler on roller skates. I had no control , and my lines wound up all over the place. I knew the results I wanted, so I stuck with it, and eventually got the hang of it.
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Edison Lee Perks on Kenosha Festival Of Cartooning Indiegogo!

I’ve dug around through my Brilliant Mind of Edison Lee ephemera and come up with King Features Sales Kits from the original 2006 launch to offer for the Kenosha Festival of Cartooning fundraising campaign on Indiegogo!

sales kit_poster

The full color kit, with illustrations on the front and back covers as well as the inside front cover, is on 100 lb card stock with a pocket containing:
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Examples from way, way, way back in the archives

Several years ago I had the great honor of having my road to syndication story printed in several issues of John Read’s amazing “Stay Tooned” Magazine. In it, I shared examples of some of my first cartoon strips. I remember like yesterday creating these first comic strips. The year was 1991, and I created them very early in the morning in my basement studio. I used to put in a full day at my Chicago agency, come home and spend a few hours with my young son, and then head off to my basement studio and work until 2-3 a.m. Cartooning was a new found passion for me, and I couldn’t get enough of it. I had no idea where it was going to lead me, but at that point it really didn’t matter. Eventually, those late nights, coupled with the stress of my job, would catch up to me. I wound up getting mononucleosis, which put me out of commission for over 3 weeks. I did recover, and have since learned to temper my late night enthusiasm a little.
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The Kenosha Festival of Cartooning indiegogo campaign is officially live!

It’s that time folks! As of noon today central time – February 25th – the Kenosha Festival of Cartooning fundraiser will be live on Indiegogo and pursuing its goal of raising $10,000 for Festival 2014, taking place next September 25th through the 27th. Festival founder and organizer Anne Morse-Hambrock  is raising money to keep the festival free and open to the public without any pesky ticket sales or registration fees.
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and the original Jeff MacNelly comic strip goes to…

On October 30th, Alan Gardner, Editor of The Daily Cartoonist, announced he was starting an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for the site. One of the incentives, announced on November 4th, was an original Jeff MacNelly Shoe comic strip. I was sitting at my computer that morning working, and Anne was on her iPad reading Alan’s latest post about the availability of this incredible piece of art. The first person to offer up the asking price owned it. I remember mentioning to Anne how great it would be to have one of his originals, and then thinking there’s no way in my lifetime I ever will. *sigh*. A minute later, without me knowing,  Anne wandered off into the other room and promptly bought it. She gave it to me at Christmas. It’s one of the most incredible presents anyone has ever given me. Thank You, Anne! (and Alan)
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My entire process from A-Z

The Brilliant Mind of Edison Lee launched with King Features in the fall of 2006, which means I’ve created over 2500 daily and Sunday comic strips.

When I compare the early strips with those I’m creating now, I see a vast improvement, both in the drawing and the writing. The drawing has gotten looser and the writing has gotten tighter. However, while the strip may have improved, and the style evolved, the process I go through to create each and every strip has remained essentially the same. I’ll usually start off by acknowledging I have deadline, followed by major panicking. After the dust has settled, it’s on to writing, followed by making coffee, panicking some more, baking cookies, purging the boiler (during the summer I’ll vacuum the air conditioners), then more writing. Somehow or another I’ve managed to make it work. Following is a step by step breakdown of how I generate 7 strips a week, 52 weeks a year.
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